КЁКУШИН КАРАТЭ

(ИОК КЁКУШИН КАЙКАН)

Филиал Запад. Лос-Анджелес

About Kyokushin

What is KANKU and its meaning?

There are no translations available.

Kanku mark means universal, international, power and balance of strength. The 5 spaces represent five continents: Africa, Asia, America, Australia, and South Pole. World is one.

The finger tips (end points) represent the high’s and low’s of our training (when we win a fight, or when we lose a fight).

The sides represent our wrists and the strength of our training. Our training keeps us humble when life is good, and helps us get through the times when life is bad.

The circle around the outside represents the continuity of life (for every beginning there is an end).

One of the goals of Kyokushinkai is world peace. It also represents Kyokushin world-wide effect.

 

List of Techniques

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This is a list of the techniques, practiced in Kyokushin kaikan.

Dachi (stances)

  • Heiko dachi (parallel open stance)
  • Haisoku dachi (closed feet stance)
  • Kakeashi dachi (hooked stance)
  • Kamae dachi (fighting stance)
  • Kiba dachi (riding stance)
  • Kokutsu dachi (backward leaning stance)
  • Moroashi dachi (two foot stance)
  • Musubi dachi (open feet stance)
  • Nekoashi dachi (cat stance)
  • Shiko dachi (sumo stance)
  • Shizen dachi (natural stance)
  • Sanchin dachi (hourglass stance/three wars stance)
  • Tsuruashi dachi (crane stance)
  • Uchihachiji dachi (pigeon toe stance/inside eight character stance)
  • Yoi dachi (ready stance)
  • Zenkutsu dachi (front bent leg stance/forward leaning stance)

Tsuki (strikes)

  • Jun tsuki (strike straight off shoulder)
  • Morote tsuki (punch with both hands)
  • Ago uchi (chin strike.Jab)
  • Gyaku tsuki (reverse lunge punch. Cross punch)
  • Kagi tsuki (rip to pit of stomach. Hook punch to body)
  • Oi tsuki (lunge punch)
  • Shita tsuki (uppercut to the body)
  • Age tsuki (uppercut to the head)
  • Mawashi uchi (Hook punch)
  • Tate tsuki (vertical fist punch)
  • Age hiji ate (rising elbow strike)
  • Hiji ate (elbow strike)
  • Mae hiji ate (front elbow strike)
  • Oroshi hiji ate (downwards elbow strike)
  • Ushiro hiji ate (backwards elbow strike)
  • Uraken ganmen uchi (backfist strike to front)
  • Uraken hizo uchi (backfist strike to spleen)
  • Uraken mawashi uchi (backfist circular strike to the head)
  • Uraken oroshi ganmen uchi (backfist downwards strike)
  • Uraken sayu ganmen uchi (backfist strike to side)
  • Uraken shomen uchi (backfist strike to the face)
  • Shuto hizo uchi (knife-hand strike to spleen)
  • Shuto jodan uchi uchi (inside knife-hand to neck)
  • Shuto sakotsu uchi (knife-hand strike to clavicle)
  • Shuto sakotsu uchikomi (driving knife-hand to sternum)
  • Shuto yoko ganmen uchi (knife-hand strike to head)
  • Tettsui hizo uchi (bottom fist strike to spleen)
  • Tettsui komekami (bottom fist strike to head)
  • Tettsui oroshi ganmen uchi (bottom fist strike downwards to head)
  • Tettsui yoko uchi (bottom fist strike to side)
  • Ippon nukite (single finger spearhand strike)(Thumb reinforces index finger)
  • Nihon nukite (two finger spearhand strike)
  • Yohon nukite (four finger spearhand strike)

Geri (kicks)

  • Age kakato ushiro geri (rising heel backwards kick)
  • Ago jodan geri (high kick to chin)
  • Mae Hiza geri (front knee kick)
  • Hiza ganmen geri (upward knee kick to face)
  • Mawashi hiza geri (circular knee kick)
  • Jodan uchi haisoku geri
  • Kakato geri (heel kick)
  • Kake geri (hooking kick)
  • Kansetsu geri (joint kick)
  • Kin geri (snap kick to groin)
  • Mae geri (front kick)
  • Mawashi geri (roundhouse kick)
  • Oroshi soto kakato geri (downwards outside heel kick
  • Oroshi uchi kakato geri (downwards inside heel kick)
  • Ushiro geri (backwards kick)
  • Ushiro mawashi geri (reverse roundhouse kick)
  • Yoko geri (side kick)
  • Tobi mae geri (jumping front kick)
  • Tobi mawashi geri (jumping roundhouse kick)
  • Tobi nidan geri (jumping double kick)
  • Tobi ushiro geri (jumping backwards kick)
  • Tobi yoko geri (jumping side kick)
  • Tobi kake geri (jumping reverse kick)
  • Tobi hiza geri (jumping knee kick)
  • Mae keage (front stretch kick)
  • Uchi mawashi keage (inside roundhouse stretch kick)
  • Soto mawashi keage (outside roundhouse stretch kick)
  • Yoko keage (side stretch kick)

Uke (blocks)

  • Chudan soto uke (middle outside block)
  • Chudan uchi uke (middle inside block)
  • Gedan barai (low sweep block)
  • Haito uchi uke (inner block with reverse knife-hand)
  • Jodan uke (upper block)
  • Koken uke (block with wrist top)
  • Mae gedan barai (low sweep block)
  • Mawashi uke (roundhouse block with palm heel)
  • Morote chudan uchi uke (middle inside block with both hands)
  • Osae uke (press down block)
  • Shuto mawashi uke (roundhouse block with knife-hand)

Ashi Uke (leg blocks)

Note. Except for Mae sune uke, these are usually practiced unnamed.

  • Mae Sune Uke (Front shin block)
  • Sune Naka Uke (outward shin block)
  • Sune Soto Uke (inward shin block)
  • Mae Hiza Uke (front knee block)
  • Hiza Naka Uke(outward knee block)
  • Hiza Soto Uke (inward knee block)
  • Mae Kaji Uke (front upper-leg block)
  • Kaji Naka Uke (outward upper-leg block)
  • Kaji Soto Uke (inward upper-leg block)
  • Teisoku Soto Mawashi Uke (inside roundhouse foot block)
  • Heisoku Uchi Mawashi Uke (outside roundhouse foot block)
  • Kakato Mae Ashi Uke (Heel frontkick block)
  • Mae Geri Ashi Dome (front stop kick)
  • Yoko Geri Ashi Dome (side stop kick)
Обновлено 07.06.2010 13:49
 

Kihon Terminology

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Kyokushin Karate Terminology - KIHON (Basic Techniques)


MIGI-SANCHIN-DACHI.................(Right Foot Forward Hour-Glass Stance, Toes Pointing In)
  SEIKEN-CHUDAN-TSUKI............(Fore Fist Middle Thrust)
  SEIKEN-JYODAN-TSUKI............(Fore Fist Upper Thrust)
  SEIKEN-AGO-TSUKI...............(Fore Fist Strike to Chin)
  URAKEN-SHO-MENUCHI.............(Back Fist Strike to Face)
  URAKEN-SAYU-UCHI...............(Left-Right, Back Fist Strike to Face)
  URAKEN-HIZO-UCHI...............(Left-Right, Back Fist Strike to Kidney Area)
  URAKEN-MAWASHI-UCHI............(Back Fist Strike to Face)


HIDARI-SANCHIN-DACHI...............(Left Foot Forward Hour-Glass Stance, Toes Pointing In)
  JYODAN-UKE.....................(Upper Block)
  CHUDAN-SOTO-UKE................(Middle Outside to Inside Block)
  CHUDAN-UCHI-UKE................(Middle Inside to Outside Block)
  GEDAN-BARAI....................(Lower Parry)
  CHUDAN-UCHI-UKE-GEDAN-BARAI....(Middle Inside to Outside Block, Lower Parry)


KIBA-DACHI (Horseback Stance, Feet Parallel)
  URAKEN-SHITA-TSUKI.............(Invert Fist Low Thrust)
  HIJI-ATE.......................(Upper Elbow Strike)
  HIJI-UCHIOROSHI................(Descending Elbow Strike)
  HIJI-AGO-UCHI..................(Rising Elbow Strike)


HEIKO-DACHI (Parallel Open Stance)
  SYUTO-YOKO-GANMEN-UCHI.........(Knife-Hand Strike to Face and Temple)
  SYUTO-SAKOTSU-UCHIOROSHI.......(Knife-Hand Strike to Collarbone)
  SYOTO-SAKOTSU-UCHIKOMI.........(Straight Knife-Hand Strike to Collarbone)
  SYOTO-HIZO-UCHI................(Knife-Hand Strike to Collarbone)
  HAITO-MAWASHI-UCHI.............(Inner Knife-Hand Roundhouse Strike)
  JYODAN-SYOTEI-UCHI.............(Palm Heel Strike to Upper)
  NUKITE.........................(Spear Hand)


HIDARI-ZENKUTSU-DACHI (Left Forward Stance, Left Foot Forward Front Stance)
  MAE-KEAGE......................(Front Straight Leg Kick)
  UCHI-MAWASHI-GERI..............(Inside Crescent Kick)
  SOTO-MAWASHI-GERI..............(Outside Crescent Kick)
  HIZA-GERI......................(Knee Kick)
  KIN-GERI.......................(Groin Kick)
  MAE-GIRI.......................(Front Snap Kick)
  MAWASHI-GERI...................(Roundhouse Kick)
  YOKO-KEAGE.....................(Knife-Foot Side Straight Leg High Kick)
  YOKO-GERI......................(Knife-Foot Side Snap Kick)
  KANSETSU-GERI..................(Knife Foot Side Snap Kick to Knee Joint)
  USHIRO-GERI....................(Back Straight Snap Kick)

 

Kyokushin Grading and Belts

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Colored belts have their origin in Judo, as does the training 'gi', or more correctly in Japanese, 'dōgi' or 'Keikogi'. In Kyokushin the order of the belts varies in some breakaway groups, but according to the Honbu of Oyama, the kyu ranks and belt colors are as follows:

Kyokushin Karate Belt Order
White Mukyu
 
Orange 10th Kyu
 
Orange with one blue stripe 9th Kyu
     
Blue 8th Kyu
 
Blue with one green stripe 7th Kyu
     
Yellow 6th Kyu
 
Yellow with one orange stripe 5th Kyu
     
Green 4th Kyu
 
Green with one brown stripe 3rd Kyu
     
Brown 2nd Kyu
 
Brown with one black stripe 1st Kyu
     
 
Black with one gold stripe Shodan (初段:しょだん)
     
Black with two gold stripes Nidan (二段:にだん)
         
Black with three gold stripes Sandan (三段:さんだん)
             
Black with four gold stripes Yondan (四段:よんだん)
                 
Black with five gold stripes Godan (五段:ごだん)
                     
Black with six gold stripes Rokudan (六段:ろくだん)
                         
Black with seven gold stripes Shichidan (七段:しちだん)
                             
Black with eight gold stripes Hachidan (八段:はちだん)
                                 
Black with nine gold stripes Kyūdan (九段:きゅうだん)
                                     
Black with ten gold stripes Jūdan (十段:じゅうだん)
                                         


Each colored belt had two levels, the second being represented by a stripe at the ends of the belt. The white belt however, does not represent any level and is only meant to hold the 'gi' in place. As such, the white belt is used by practitioners who are not yet graded. The belt system under Mas Oyama followed this order since the 1960s with the exception of the yellow (red) belt, which was incorporated only in the last year of his life, replacing the earlier used white belt with one and two red stripes for the same kyu grades.

Whilst some groups also use red belts for high dan grades, it is not the norm and Oyama himself did not follow this practice in his dojo or organization, always wearing a wholly black belt himself.

There are many ideas of how the belt colors in the martial arts came to be, some more romantic than others. One quaint tale says that students of a karate school would be given a white belt. The students' belts would gradually become stained darker from use and eventually a person who was of a high standard and who had trained for a long time would then have a black/brown/dirt colored belt. This is an inspiring way to encourage students to train harder, and might have its basis in truth since martial arts practitioners as a general rule don't wash their belts after training. However, no evidence exists of this, so there is no hard and fast rule according to the Japanese and romantic notions of the belt containing the training spirit and hard toil of years of training are generally invented in the West. The tradition of only sparingly washing the belt is more likely based on the more practical reason that belts tend to lose their color if washed too often.

Perhaps the most widely read and respected interpretation of the fundamental psychological requirements of each level is found in the book, The Budo Karate of Sosai Masutatsu Oyama, written by former interpreter to Sosai Masutatsu Oyama, Cameron Quinn. Kyokushin karate has a belt grading system similar to other martial arts. The requirements of each level vary from country to country, some far stricter and more demanding than others. For example, in some countries in Europe, the grading for each level requires the student to complete the entire requirements for each level up to the rank being tested. So the student attempting first degree black belt will do all the Orange belt requirements, THEN all the blue belt requirements (including repeating the orange belt requirements) and so on. The free fighting (kumite) requirements for first degree black belt also ranges from ten rounds to forty rounds, depending on the region, usually at a very high level of contact and with no protective gear other than a groin guard and mouth guard. It is not so much the number of fights but the intensity of the effort that defines the grading. Some areas don't even have formal gradings per se, instead presenting the student with their new rank in training after the instructor feels that he/she has reached that level and is capable of all the requirements.

The belt assigned to each student upon commencing training is a white belt. With each successful grading attempt the student is awarded a kyu ranking, and either a stripe on his current belt or a new belt colour altogether. Grading, or promotion tests, include calisthenic and aerobic training, kihon (basics), ido geiko (moving basics), goshinjitsu (self defence), sanbon and ippon kumite (three and one step sparring), (prescribed series of movements/forms, sometimes described as a form of moving meditation), tameshiwari (board, tile or brick breaking) and kumite (contact free fighting). Achieving a 1st dan black belt, or shodan, can take anywhere from four but often six to ten years of training. A belt may be awarded only by a teacher after a grading, some lower grades, e.g., yellow stripe or yellow, can be assessed in a local dojo by an instructor, after 2 or 3 grades, you will have to wait until a "grading" usually only performed approximately 4 times a year or at martial arts camps where there are shodan and above gradings, and 50 man kumite also are performed on rare occasions. At the highest ranks (6th dan and above) tests are performed by international committee, or, as is more common in the post-Mas Oyama era, presented honorarily. Nobody can achieve a 10th degree black belt for this was a special honor created only for the Sosai (Oyama).

Each belt has a different number of fights required for the rank sparring for grading starts at white belt. Of all aspects, it is the strong and spirited contact kumite that most defines the Kyokushin style, and it is this aspect that has always brought the style the most respect. The one thing that usually defined the Kyokushin black belt was the spirit, strength and courage of the kumite.

The number of rounds required may increase or decrease after Shodan, again depending on the region. 40 rounds of hard contact sparring is required as part of a grading or as part of a special training requirement, is no easy feat and involves non-stop fighting of one and a half hours or more. It is a test of fortitude as well as skill.

Обновлено 09.08.2010 23:50
 

Kyokushin Kanji and it's Meaning

There are no translations available.

Kanji is the representation (using Chinese characters) of the word kyokushinkai, which is the name of the ryu or style.

Translated kyoku means ultimate, shin means truth or reality and kai means to join or associate. This concept has less to do with the western meaning of truth and is more in keeping with the bushido (warrior) concept of discovering the nature of ones true character when put to the test.

One of the goals of kyokushin is to strengthen and improve character by challenging oneself through rigorous training.

 

International Karate Organization

There are no translations available.

The International Karate Organization (IKO) and the Kyokushinkaikan follow the Karate way of building character, and training the mind and body to contribute to society, based on Sosai Mas Oyama's Kyokushin spirit:

"Keep your head low (modesty), eyes high (ambition), mouth shut (serenity); base yourself on filial piety and benefit others."

We in Kyokushin Karate-Do do not promote or practice discrimination or prejudice based on ethnicity, race, nationality, politics, philosophy, religion, sex or age and recognize that everyone has the same rights. Our greatest pursuit is to reach for the goal of international friendship and World Peace.

Kyokushin Karate West Los Angeles is an Official Branch of the International Karate Organization.

 

Promotion Test Requirements

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The Promotion Test will take into consideration physical ability, age, training consistency, improvement since last grading (if applicable) and prior experience. In addition to the following, students are asked to execute Kihon (basics), Ido-geiko (moving-basics) and have a thorough working knowledge of Kyokushin terminology, philosophy and history as appropriate for their rank. The following are based on the IKO Technical Syllabus and are ideals to aspire to. All or some of the techniques mentioned may be asked of you. Promotion test is just one step on the road ahead.
Train hard and do your best! OSU!

 

1. White Belt, promoting to Orange Belt

Kata: Taikyoku Sono Ichi/ Ni, Sokugi Taikyoku Sono Ichi
Kumite: Light sparring: 30 sec x 1 to 3 rounds
Conditioning: Push-up: 20 Squat: 20 Hand-stand: 20 sec.
Flexibility: Head touches the floor from a seated position with legs open
Jump: leg-Kick to a target level as high as your own height
Tenure (Suggested): 3 months (36~48 hours)

 

 

2a. Orange Belt, 10th Kyu – promoting to Orange Belt, 9th Kyu [Orange with stripe]

Kata: the above plus: Taikyoku Sono San
Tenure (Suggested): 3 months (36~48 hours)

 

 

2b. Orange Belt, 9th Kyu – promoting to Blue Belt, 8th Kyu

Kata: the above plus: Sokugi Taikyoku Sono Ni/San
Tenure (Suggested): 3 months (36~48 hours)
Orange REQ: Kumite: Jiyu Kumite: 1 minute x 1 to 3 rounds
Conditioning: Push-up: 30 Squat: 30 Hand-stand: 30 sec
Flexibility: same as above with improvement. Jump: eg-Kick to your height plus 10cm.

 

 

3a. Blue Belt, 8th Kyu – promoting to Blue Belt, 7th Kyu [blue with stripe]

Kata: the above plus: Pinan Sono Ichi
Tenure (Suggested): 3 months (36~48 hours)

 

 

3a. Blue Belt, 7th Kyu – promoting to Yellow Belt, 6th Kyu

Kata: the above plus: Pinan Sono Ni, Sanchin no Kata
Tenure (Suggested): 3 months (36~48 hours)
Blue REQ: Kumite: Jiyu Kumite: 1 minute x 2 to 4 rounds
Conditioning: Push-up: 40 Squat: 40 Hand-stand: 40 sec
Flexibility: same as above except chest touches floor. Jump: eg-Your height plus 15cm.

 

 

4a. Yellow Belt, 6th Kyu - promoting to Yellow Belt, 5th Kyu [yellow with stripe]

Kata: the above plus: Pinan Sono San, Yantsu
Tenure (Suggested): 3 months (36~48 hours)

 

 

4b. Yellow Belt, 5th Kyu – promoting to Green Belt, 4th Kyu

Kata: the above plus: Pinan Sono Yon, Tsuki no Kata
Tenure (Suggested): 3 months (36~48 hours)
Yellow REQ: Kumite: Jiyu Kumite: 1 minute x 3 to 5 rounds
Conditioning: Push-up: 50 Squat: 50 Hand-stand: 50 sec
Flexibility: same as above with improvement. Jump: eg-Your height plus 20cm.
Additional: Must have consistent participation in local Dojo scheduled events

 

 

5a. Green Belt, 4th Kyu - promoting to Green belt, 3rd Kyu [green with stripe]

Kata: the above plus: Pinan Sono Go, Geki Sai Dai
Kumite: Jiyu Kumite: 1 minutes x 5 to 7 rounds
Conditioning: Push-up: 60 Squat: 60 Hand-stand: 60 seconds
Flexibility: Chest must touch floor in seated position. Jump: eg-Your height plus 30cm.
Tenure (Suggested): 6 months (72~96 hours)
Additional: Must have consistent participation in local events and attend IKO events as able

 

 

5b. Green Belt, 3rd Kyu - promoting to Brown Belt, 2nd Kyu

Kata: the above plus: Geki Sai Sho, Taikyoku Sono Ichi, Ni & San “Ura”, Tekki Sono Ichi
Kumite: Jiyu Kumite: 1 minutes x 5 to 8 rounds
Conditioning: Push-up: 70 Squat: 70 Hand-stand: 70 seconds
Flexibility: same as above with improvement. Jump: eg-Your height plus 30cm.
Tenure (Suggested): 6 months (72~96 hours)
Additional: Must be able to recite Dojo Kun in English & assist in classroom instruction as able

 

 

6a. Brown Belt, 2nd Kyu - promoting to Brown Belt, 1st Kyu [brown with stripe]

Kata: the above plus: Saifa, Tensho
Kumite: Jiyu Kumite: 1 minutes x 10 rounds
Conditioning: Push-up: 80 Squat: 80 Hand-stand: 80 seconds
Flexibility: Same as above with improvement. Jump: eg-Target strike with back spin kick
Tenure (Suggested): 6 months (72~96 hours)
Additional: Must be able to recite Dojo Kun in Japanese and capable to lead warm up in class.

 

 

6b. Brown Belt, 1st Kyu - promoting to Black Belt, “Sho Dan”, first level

Kata: the above plus: Pinan Sono Ichi, Ni, San, Yon, Go “Ura” (reverse), Tekki Sono Ni, Bo Kihon Sono Ichi
Goshin Jitsu (Self-Defense): Basic Movement
Kumite: Jiyu Kumite: 1 minutes x 15 rounds
Conditioning: Push-up: 100 Squat: 100 Hand-stand: 90 seconds
Flexibility / Jump: Same as for 2nd kyu, with better execution.
Board Breaking: leg-Jump over 100cm rope and break two boards with Yoko Geri
Tenure (Minimum): 6 months (96 hours)
Additional: Must have participated in a minimum of two IKO international seminars, camps, clinics or competitive tournaments and be an exemplary Kyokushin student and Dojo member.

 

 

*** Black Belt, “Sho Dan” - promoting to Black Belt, “Ni Dan”, second level

Kata: Seienchin, Garyu, Tekki Sono San, Bassai Dai, Chion, Nunchaku Kihon Sono Ichi, Tonfa Kihon Sono Ichi
Goshin Jitsu (Self-Defense): Advanced Movement
Kumite: Jiyu Kumite: 1 minutes x 20 rounds
Conditioning: Push-up: 100 Squat: 100 Hand-stand: 120 seconds
Flexibility / Jump: Same as for 2nd kyu, with better execution.
Board Breaking: leg-Jump over 120cm rope and break two boards with Yoko Geri.
Tenure (Minimum): 12 months (192 hours)
Additional: Must consistently participate in and support IKO international seminars, camps, clinics or competitive tournaments and be an exemplary Kyokushin Senpai and Branch member.

 

 

*** Black Belt, “Ni Dan” - promoting to Black Belt, “San Dan”, third level

Kata: Seipai, Soki, Taizan
Goshin Jitsu (Self-Defense): Advanced Movement
Kumite: Jiyu Kumite: 1 minutes x 30 rounds
Conditioning: Push-up: 100 Squat: 100 Hand-stand: 120 seconds
Flexibility / Jump: Same as for 2nd kyu, with better execution.
Tenure (Minimum): 24 months (384 hours)
Additional: Must consistently participate in and support IKO international seminars, camps, clinics or competitive tournaments and be an exemplary Kyokushin Senpai / must have IKO Senior Advisor’s formal written recommendation for consideration / possess the minimum IKO Judge Certification

 

Обновлено 19.09.2010 23:01
 

Kyokushin Spirit

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"The heart of our karate is real fighting.
There can be no proof without real fighting.
Without proof there is no trust.
Without trust there is no respect.
This is a definition in the world of Martial Arts."

 

Обновлено 31.05.2010 03:05
 

The Eleven Mottoes of Mas Oyama

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  • The Martial Way begins and ends with courtesy. Therefore, be properly and genuinely courteous at all times.
  • Following the Martial Way is like scaling a cliff - continue upwards without rest. It demands absolute and unfaltering devotion to the task at hand.
  • Strive to seize the initiative in all things, all the time guarding against actions stemming from selfish animosity or thoughtlessness.
  • Even for the Martial Artist, the place of money cannot be ignored. Yet one should be careful never to become attached to it.
  • The Martial Way is centered in posture. Strive to maintain correct posture at all times.
  • The Martial Way begins with one thousand days and is mastered after ten thousand days of training.
  • In the Martial Arts, introspection begets wisdom. Always see contemplation on your action as an opportunity to improve.
  • The nature and purpose of the Martial Way is universal. All selfish desires should be roasted in the tempering fires of hard training.
  • The Martial Arts begins with a point and end in a circle. Straight lines stem from this principle.
  • The true essence of the Martial Way can only be realized through experience. Knowing this, learn never to fear its demands.
  • Always remember: In the Martial Arts the rewards of a confident and Grateful heart are truly abundant.
Обновлено 31.05.2010 03:06
 


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